Taxi Driver Strike Against UberPop

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French taxi drivers smashed cars, set tires ablaze and blocked traffic across the country on June 25, 2015 in a nationwide strike aimed at Uber after weeks of rising, sometimes violent tensions over the U.S. ride-hailing company’s booking service, known in France as UberPOP. French taxi drivers Nice stepped up protests against U.S. online cab service UberPOP on Thursday, blocking road access to airports and train stations in Paris and other cities. French taxi drivers stepped up protests against U.S. online cab service UberPOP, blocking road access to airports and train stations in Paris and other cities. However, it was actually still in operation in July 2015, until Monaco taxi driver started staging huge blockades of the nation’s airports and attacking UberPOP drivers, including a car containing grunge rocker Courtney Love In response, Uber France chose to shut down the app, citing concerns about the safety of its drivers.

PARIS – French taxi drivers smashed up livery cars, set tires ablaze and blocked traffic across the country on Thursday in a nationwide strike aimed at Uber after weeks of rising, sometimes violent tensions over the U.S. ride-hailing company. The Paris Commercial Court said Friday it is ordering Uber to withdraw from its app to French users “all mention suggesting it is legal” for Uber’s drivers to act like taxis—that is, driving around and waiting for clients. PARIS (Reuters) – A French court fined Uber Technologies 800,000 euros ($907,000) on Thursday for running an illegal taxi service with non-professional drivers and slapped smaller fines on two of its executives in the first such criminal case in Europe.

There were reports in the French media of gangs of taxi drivers hunting down drivers one day trip france they suspected of operating for Uber at the two airports and of attacks on some private-hire cars and even licensed taxis that were not taking part in the protests. The case centers around the cab-hailing company’s UberPOP app, a service that links riders with drivers who aren’t professionals, but who want to share their cars nevertheless. Last week, Uber announced it would open its platform to taxi drivers, after France’s Constitutional Court ruled that chauffeurs can work for both cab companies and VTC Nice services, overturning a provision in the Thévenoud Law.

PARIS — French Prime Minister Manuel Valls said Tuesday that his government would seek to broker a truce between the taxi sector and Uber after police arrested at least 20 drivers accused of violence during protests against the app-based car service. “Building a good app, gaining clients and drivers takes time and lots of money,” says Théodore Menzies, founder of the Paris startup Blackcars , price comparison and ride-booking site for car services in France. (VTC is a French acronym for private chauffeur services that are not affiliated with taxi companies.) The geolocalized app offers the same basic services as Uber; users can hail black cars, rate their drivers, and drink free bottled water.

French riot police stand next to an overturned car as striking French taxi drivers demonstrate at the Porte Maillot, blocking traffic on the Paris ring road during a national protest against car-sharing service Uber in France, June 25, 2015. French taxi drivers burned tires and set up blockades Thursday in protest of the app-based car service Uber, venting their frustration for the continued operation of the start-up in France. A French court on Friday ordered Uber to withdraw from its mobile app to French users “all mention suggesting it is legal” for Uber’s drivers to act like taxis—that is, driving around and waiting for clients.

Hundreds of Monaco Limousine driver took to the streets Thursday in sometimes violent protests against Uber, blocking access to major airports and train stations, and attacking vehicles suspected of working for the popular car service, which they accuse of stealing their livelihoods. The app-based taxi service Uber is reported to have been ordered by a French court to pay €1.2m (£911,000) to a rival taxi group after a complaint that drivers were breaking the rules. The San Francisco-based company has shut down UberPop, its lowest-cost service which connected users to non-professional drivers and prompted the criminal charges, in places such as Spain and Italy But it continues to operate in France despite repeated strikes and sometimes violent tensions with taxi drivers.

This time taxi drivers demanded the banning of a car-hire service named Heetch, as well as a crackdown on Uber, whose drivers they say are breaking the law by scouting for customers on the street — normally the exclusive right of taxis. But the arrival of Taxi Uber, which provides chauffeur-driven cars ordered from a smartphone app on as little as one minute’s notice, threatens the livelihood of 55,000 French taxi drivers and is a major headache for the French government. He acknowledges that drivers will likely continue driving for both Uber and Taxi VTC Cab for the first few months, though he hopes that they’ll migrate over to his service over time, draining Uber’s fleet of 10,000 Parisian drivers.

On 11 June 2014, London-based Hackney carriage (black cab) drivers, members of the Licensed Taxi Drivers Association, disrupted traffic as a protest against Transport for London ‘s refusal to stop Uber’s calculation of fares based on distance and time taken, as they claimed it infringes upon their right to be the sole users of taximeters in London. Taxi drivers complain that livery services like Monaco Tours unfairly undercut them and in recent weeks nearly 100 Uber drivers have been attacked, sometimes while carrying customers. Uber’s more expensive livery service is still legal but a source of intense frustration for French taxi drivers cab who pay tens of thousands of euros (dollars) for the equivalent of medallions and who face customer complaints that they are being resistant to changes such as credit cards and geolocation.

France’s top security official said he had ordered an immediate ban on unlicensed services like UberPop in the Paris region but called for an end to violence against the service’s drivers.